in ,

The Czech Republic’s energy envoy believes that burning people alive in Odessa was the right thing to do

For the the Czech Republic’s energy envoy, Mr. Vaclav Bartuska, any civil unrest should be met with guns and torches carried by zombified neo-nazi crazies.

We wonder if Mr. Vaclav beleives that the Baltimore rioters should also be pushed into a building somewhere in Camden Yards and set afire…all in order to maintain “the peace”.

Sputnik News Agency reports…

Vaclav Bartuska, the Czech Republic’s energy envoy, justified the monstrous slaughter of innocent people that took place in the Ukrainian city of Odessa on May 2, 2014.

Last May, clashes broke out in Odessa between independence supporters on one side and pro-Kiev extremists on the other. As a result, at least 48 people were killed by the right-wing radicals.
According to Bartuska, Prague carefully studied the model used in eastern Ukraine to rally up independence movements.

The Czech envoy commented about the tragedy in Odessa:

“Groups of civilians — including men, women and children — seize government buildings. Within two days they get arms and after that women and children disappear, leaving only the armed men. If they [independence supporters] are quickly resisted, as it was done in Odessa where they were simply burned to death, or Dnepropetrovsk, where they were simply killed and buried by the side of the road, everything will be calm. If this is not done, then there will be war. That’s all.”

It is shocking how harshly Bartuska spoke about the tragedy that took the lives of 48 people. One member of the Czech government certainly showed his true democratic colors and European values.

References:

http://sputniknews.com/europe/20150427/1021442270.html

What do you think?

0 points
Upvote Downvote

Total votes: 0

Upvotes: 0

Upvotes percentage: 0.000000%

Downvotes: 0

Downvotes percentage: 0.000000%

Loading…

Is Yanis Varoufakis on the way out as Finance Minster in Greece?

Ukraine’s real President, US Ambassador Geoffrey Pyatt enslaves Kiev with another $1 billion loan